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How Do You Measure Up?

By Shirley Bond


Why does everyone need this book?

Because it is the one stop source of information for success in the kitchen.

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£7.99

978-0-955891120 [F17]

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Why does everyone need this book?

Because it is the one stop source of information for success in the kitchen.

 

Around the world there are thousands of cookery books on sale and numerous recipes in magazines and newspapers.

 

In recent years many recipe books and magazines have been available between countries, enabling dishes from another country’s cuisine to be enjoyed.  Then there are old housecraft books, recipe books and collections of recipes written in note books and on scraps of paper lovingly handed down through the generations.

 

In order to enjoy any recipe from such a variety of sources, it is essential for the cook to be able to understand the measures given. Recipes are now sometimes found with the ingredients only listed in metric measures.  These often have to be converted into Imperial measures or cups so people can make them.  Older recipes giving only Imperial measures can be difficult for people to follow who are only familiar with metric measures.  Cooks in many countries want to enjoy recipes written using cup measures but do not know the equivalent measures in Imperial or metric.  More confusion is caused by the UK  ounce being taken as equivalent to 25 grams, while in Australia an ounce is taken as 30 grams.  Cup capacities vary between countries and even the pint is different in the UK to the USA.

 

Converting recipes for success cannot be a straightforward mathematical exercise. Some books and magazines include a small conversion chart, but many of these have been found to be unreliable, resulting in mistakes being made and the recipe not being a success.

 

It is not just measures of food which can be a problem.  Equipment sizes vary too.  If a recipe states ‘transfer mixture into a 1 pint basin’ how do you know if the basin you have is the right size.  If the recipe states ‘cook cake mixture in a 23 cm square tin, what size is that in Imperial measures and what ingredients do you need for the same recipe made in a round tin?  What weight is 1 USA cup of currants?  How much almond paste is required to cover various sized cakes? How much food should you serve for a buffet party and how long does it take for turkeys to defrost? The problems are endless, but this book aims to clarify numerous situations to enable all cooks everywhere to enjoy making healthy meals at home.

 

Reviews

 

The Best British Cookbooks of 2012: Placed 4th 

 

New book takes the confusion out of cooking full review: FoodnDrink.co.uk

 

"...a handy book that will help bakers not only switch effortlessly from one set of weights and measures to another, but also understand recipes from around the world." Full review, Teesdale Mercury 13 March 2013.

 

Best British Cookbook of 2012 - Full review

 

Michael Vanheste

 

Squidbeak blog 

 

"I read your posting on the GFW Forum a few weeks ago and sent away for a copy of your book; it arrived yesterday and I just wanted to thank you for putting everything one needs to know in one neat volume! I'm sure it will be an extremely useful addition to my collection.

 A couple of weeks ago I was struggling to remember the conversion for working out the volume of a pastry case that I needed to fill. After several attempts I eventually worked it out with a combination of trawling the internet and the depths of my mind and my partner's, but now I have it much more conveniently on page 18 of your book" Katherine Hawkins Food 

 

"Just recently, I helped gather some recipes for a diary project. It was only when I tried to convert some american measurements into metric that I discovered how challenging it was work out all the equivalents. There are so many times you get stumped in the kitchen. At Christmas time, your recipe gives ingredients for an 20 cm cake tin, but what if your container is smaller or larger? You’re using one of your mother’s old recipes and have no idea what temperature you need to set the oven at as she cooked with gas and you’ve got electric. Shirley Bond’s book “How do you measure up” is a real gem. It gives you all the answers to the above and so many, many more from how many sausage rolls you can make from a quantity of pastry to an explanation of what British and American cooking terms mean." Full review Edinburghfoodie.com

 

"I am a travel book reviewer and a cookbook reviewer and this book falls into neither of those categories ...but on the other hand (the hand is a non-SI unit of length, now used only for the measurement of the height of horses) it fits nicely into both." Full review Mostly Food Journal

 

"For those who find recipe measures and conversions difficult, Shirley Bond has self-published a brilliant and simple to use handbook How do you Measure Up? All Your Measuring and Weighing Questions Answered which deals with tricky questions like… "Can you convert Imperial measures to and from metric measures and cupcapacities so you can enjoy any recipe regardless of how it is written?" Irish Examiner

 

"A new book from Shirley Bond, entitled How Do You Measure Up? is based on the decades of experience the author has as a food writer, dietician and nutrition lecturer. This is a book that will be very useful for those who wish to cook without any confusion. The country’s top chefs have already heaped praise upon it, making it extremely popular." Full review FoodnDrink.co.uk

 

‘How Do You Measure Up?’ doesn’t mince its words, so don’t expect romantic prose or shots of an ample-bottomed yet alluring kitchen goddess carefully balancing an artfully-rusted set of retro scales. Instead, author Shirley Bond has concisely grouped various weighing and measuring issues into chapters covering abbreviations, foreign equivalents, cooking equipment and cooking methodology. And nothing more. For full review Foodepedia.co.uk

 

"Bit of a personal question in many respects, but we are talking about cooking here.  How to convert recipes from one format to another, what is a cup of flour in grams….Why does everyone need this book? Because it is the one stop source of information for success in the kitchen." Full review James McIntosh

 

"There are cookbooks to cater for every taste and culinary ability and you can download just about any recipe with a click of the mouse.  Unusually,  this incredibly useful handbook by Shirley Bond, doesn’t include any actual recipes but it certainly solves a whole lot of cooking conundrums." Full review About My Generation

 

"Today, we have to cope with weights and measures in every sphere of modern business and home  life and it can be difficult to understand abbreviations and symbols we see on our packaging.  Mistakes can easily be made...Help is at hand." Full review Sylvia Kent  

 

"To say that it is packed with detailed conversions is an understatement....Already my copy of the book has that much-used, thumb-marked look..." Full review The Herb Society Journal Vol 37 No4 2012

 

 

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